My Upgrade to 8.1 is Not Going Smoothly

Update 2013 October 29: And the solution is here: http://blogs.technet.com/b/dennis_schnell/archive/2013/08/31/windows-8-1-wifi-showing-quot-limitied-quot-or-quot-no-internet-access-quot.aspx?PageIndex=2.
To summarize, if you can’t get online after upgrading to 8.1, or if you can’t get online from certain access points, then this might be the solution: Click the link, search for “Kyle”. Read Kyle’s answer then read the paragraph that starts with, “Hey Kyle! You are the man”. Choosing the Broadcom driver worked for me.

Here’s what happened after the original post: As I said in the original post (below), I refreshed the laptop. That dropped me back to Windows 8.0. I waited until I was at school with some free time before trying to upgrade again, so if it failed again I would be able to use a school computer to chat with a tech. It failed again. This time, the tech said, “Unfortunately, the driver for Windows 8.1 isn’t available [from Acer]”, and suggested that I download the latest driver from Broadcom. But I couldn’t find the latest driver on Broadcom’s site. What I found was a forum reply from August

Hi,

Is there a driver that works properly for Windows version 8.1 preview 64 bit.

for BCM57780

Can you please provide me the link to the correct 64 bit driver?

I am always getting disconnects etc

Thank-you,

Shawn

Sorry, no drivers yet for Windows 8.1, they won’t be available until around the time the OS is available at retail. If you’re having problems with the in-box driver then report it to Microsoft so they’re aware of the issue.

Dave

So I used Kyle’s suggestion and seem to be up and running with 8.1.

Below is the original post.

I upgraded from Windows 8 to Windows 8.1 because Windows Store offered the free upgrade in a big purple tile. Then I couldn’t get on-line as school, and I ended up refreshing Windows IAW advice from Acer’s tech support.

Update to Windows 8.1 for free

I started the upgrade while at school but it took so long that I paused it and finished it at home. Everything seemed fine until I got back to school the next day.

Although I could get online at home, I couldn’t get an IP address from either of the schools’s networks. I tried a few things on my own, asked advice from friends, and then spent an hour or so with Acer in a couple of different sessions over two days. The tech in the last of those sessions gave up and advised me to refresh the laptop. That’s not nearly as bad as wiping your hard disk and reinsalling everything, but it’s still a pain. Refreshing saves your files and re-installs the original configuration plus your Windows Store purchases, but you’re on your own for re-installing any programs you got outside of Windows Store.

The refresh took me back to Windows 8.0, and I will try to upgrade again. I’ll let you know how it goes.

First day with a Win 8 laptop

I ordered and Acer E1 with a third generation (aka Ivy Bridge) Intel i5 processor and Windows 8. It arrived yesterday. Almost certainly, I should have waited a couple of weeks longer as prices are likely to keep falling through August, but ordering the laptop was the only way to stop myself from obsessively checking for deals. If you want a laptop with a 3rd generation processor, the first weeks of August are probably the best time to buy, if you look for deals. My laptop has a 3rd generation i5 processor, 4 gigs of RAM, and a 500GB hard disk, and I got it for $399 plus shipping (after a mail in rebate) from Tiger Direct. It does not have a touchscreen. Prices are falling so dealers can make way for the 4th generation (Haswell) processors. If battery life is important to you, you might want to pay the extra money and hold out for a Haswell.


Acer Aspire E1-571-6837 3rd Gen i5, 4GB, 500GB, from Tiger Direct: 449.99, 399.99 after Rebate

While looking for deals, don’t get tricked into buying a 2nd generation (Sandy Bridge) chip or older. If you get a great price on an older chip and it’s what you want, that’s fine, as long as you know what you’re getting. The generations are marked by the first number after the dash. My chip is an i5-3230M, and it’s the first “3” that designates the generation. Also don’t get fooled by a “5” after the dash, followed by two more digits instead of three more. Those are actually older.

The i5 seemed like a good match for me. I’m on too much of a budget for an i7 and I’m not a gamer. An i3 is better for budget buyers who don’t run a lot of intensive applications. Budget buyers who will primarily use their laptops for email should also consider the very low prices available on 2nd generation Intel chips, Pentiums, Celerons, and several others out there. AMD makes comparable chips to Intel. The AMD A8-4500M seems to be at about the same level as the Intel i5. As with Intel based computers, be careful about chip model numbers.

One of the first things I tried to do was load Ubuntu 13.04 in a dual boot configuration, but the Ubuntu setup didn’t recognize the existing Windows 8 installation and wanted to format the disk as if it was empty. There’s plenty of information on-line about working around that problem, just like there’s plenty of information about working around the new UEFI security feature, but the less then perfect installation start and the difficulties I’ve read about overcoming the UEFI feature were the last of a dozen or so reasons that made me decide, for now at least, to leave the laptop configured as a single boot Windows 8 machine. Instead, I installed Virtualbox and loaded Ubuntu on a VM.

So I’m succumbing to Microsoft for now. My first impression of Windows 8 is: I like it. The negative backlash against Windows 8 is wrong-headed but I do appreciate the affect that it’s had on prices.

Windows 8 is surprisingly keyboard friendly. Even though it’s designed for touch, I can hit the Windows Key and then type a command or part of a command, like “chrom” or “word”, and get a list of matching applications. It works better than hitting Alt F2 in Unity or Gnome. I can also navigate the start screen easily with the keyboard arrows, and I can shutdown the system without touching the mouse or touchpad by hitting ctrl-alt-delete, then using the tab key to get the power icon. When using the keyboard is easier in Windows then in Linux, it might be time for a shift in thinking.

Windows 8 results from typing 'word'

I also like the live tiles.

I’m still wary of using Windows as my primary OS. I spend a lot of time fixing bugs and removing spyware from my wife and daughter’s computers. My son uses Linux and I never had to fuss with such problems on his laptop. But I like Windows 8 so far. I like the UI more than the UI of previous versions of Windows and I’ve gotten very frustrated with Unity and Gnome. I’m willing to give Windows another go.

So, so far so good. As of Day 1, I’m happy with my Acer and I’m happy with Windows 8.

Update (same day) I’ve already had to remove adware extensions from Chromium. I was getting ads when I clicked on links, and while poking around the settings found an extension called “tidynetworks”. I removed the extension but I don’t yet know if I’ll have to do more to properly get rid of it. I also had something called webcake and I removed that as well.